DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF SELF‐MONITORING ATTENTION, ACCURACY, AND PRODUCTIVITY

John W. Maag, Robert Reid, Samuel A. DiGangi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Effects of self‐monitoring on‐task behavior, academic productivity, and academic accuracy were assessed with 6 elementary‐school students with learning disabilities in their general education classroom using a mathematics task. Following baseline, the three self‐monitoring conditions were introduced using a multiple schedule design during independent practice sessions. Although all three interventions yielded improvements in either arithmetic productivity, accuracy, or on‐task behavior, self‐monitoring academic productivity or accuracy was generally superior. Differential results were obtained across age groups: fourth graders' mathematics performance improved most when self‐monitoring productivity, whereas sixth graders' performance improved most when self‐monitoring accuracy. 1993 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-344
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of applied behavior analysis
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

Keywords

  • learning disabled
  • self‐monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Philosophy
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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