Discrepancies in reporting of physical and sexual abuse among homeless young adults

Kimberly A. Tyler, Lisa A. Melander

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated risk factors for discrepant reporting of physical and sexual abuse among 172 homeless young adults. Discrepant reporting includes situations in which a respondent denies experiencing abuse in general but reports being a victim of specific forms of maltreatment. The results revealed that discrepant reporting rates tended to be highest for minor physical assault and for noncontact sexual abuse. Multivariate results revealed that demographic characteristics were important correlates of both discrepant physical and sexual abuse reporters. Family background characteristics also played a role in discrepant reporting for physical abuse. Overall, some young people with abuse histories are not adequately labeling their maltreatment experiences and, as a result, may not be receiving the necessary treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)513-531
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Child Sexual Abuse
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Abuse
  • Discrepant reporting
  • Homeless

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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