Do “creative” and “non-creative” workers exhibit similar preferences for urban amenities? An exploratory case study of Omaha, Nebraska

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5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research into the locational decisions of creative class or knowledge workers has indicated that “classic” or “hard” factors, particularly employment opportunity and social connections, generally take precedence over “soft”, “quality of place” amenities such as art and cultural venues, historical assets, and tolerance/diversity. However, “soft” amenities are expected to shape where creative class/knowledge workers live within cities, and potentially whether they remain in the community long-term, or seek opportunities elsewhere. In this study, an online survey and questionnaire were employed to explore whether residents living in downtown Omaha, Nebraska with “creative” occupations exhibit stronger preferences for urban amenities relative to those with “non-creative” occupations. Generally in support of Richard Florida’s creative class thesis, the results suggest that creative workers may exhibit a stronger affinity for certain, primarily “soft,” urban amenities and characteristics, such as dining establishments, “third places”, arts/cultural venues, unique sense of place, and the hip, trendy, and youthful feel of Omaha’s downtown neighborhoods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)198-216
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Urbanism
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2017

Keywords

  • Creative class
  • creative workers
  • knowledge workers
  • quality of place
  • residential choice
  • urban amenities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Urban Studies

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