Does Drinking to Cope Explain Links between Emotion-Driven Impulse Control Difficulties and Hazardous Drinking? A Longitudinal Test

Laura E. Watkins, Molly R. Franz, David DiLillo, Kim L. Gratz, Terri L. Messman-Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Difficulty controlling impulsive behaviors when experiencing negative emotions is a prominent risk factor for hazardous alcohol use, and prior research suggests that drinking to cope may mediate this association. The present study examines this possibility prospectively in a sample of 490 young adult women between the ages of 18 and 25. Participants completed measures of emotion-driven impulse control difficulties, drinking to cope, and hazardous alcohol use at 6 time points over the course of approximately 20 months (i.e., 1 assessment every 4 months). Multilevel structural equation modeling revealed that drinking to cope fully mediated the relationship between emotion-driven impulse control difficulties and hazardous alcohol use when examining these relationships between individuals and partially mediated this relation when examining these relationships within individuals. These findings suggest that drinking to cope is a key mechanism in the relationship between emotion-driven impulse control difficulties and hazardous drinking. Results highlight the importance of targeting both emotion dysregulation and drinking to cope when treating young women for alcohol use problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)875-884
Number of pages10
JournalPsychology of Addictive Behaviors
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • drinking motives
  • emotion regulation
  • impulse control difficulties
  • longitudinal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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