Does Polyvictimization Affect Incarcerated and Non-Incarcerated Adult Women Differently? An Exploration Into Internalizing Problems

Dana L. Radatz, Emily M. Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this study, we used data from life histories of 424 non-incarcerated (n = 266) and incarcerated (n = 158) women to examine the extent to which women are exposed to multiple forms of victimization, including child abuse, intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and traumatic life events. We assessed the effects of polyvictimization (e.g., multiple victimizations) on women’s health-related outcomes (e.g., attempted suicide, drug and alcohol problems) as well as whether the prevalence rates and effects of victimization were significantly different between the subsamples of women. Results indicate that incarcerated women experience significantly more victimization than non-incarcerated women, and while polyvictimization was associated with a higher likelihood of alcohol problems, drug problems, and attempted suicide among non-incarcerated women, it was only marginally associated with an increased likelihood of alcohol problems among incarcerated women. Finally, low levels of polyvictimization affected alcohol and drug problems among incarcerated and non-incarcerated women differently.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1379-1400
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume32
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

Keywords

  • alcohol use
  • drug use
  • female offenders
  • polyvictimization
  • suicide
  • victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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