Does Successful Weight Loss in an Internet-Based Worksite Weight Loss Program Improve Employee Presenteeism and Absenteeism?

Samantha M. Harden, Wen You, Fabio A. Almeida, Jennie L. Hill, Laura A. Linnan, Kacie C. Allen, Paul A. Estabrooks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Certain risk factors associated with overweight and obesity may lead to reduced productivity in the workforce (i.e., increased absenteeism and presenteeism). Participants in a large, Internet-based worksite weight loss intervention, who were present at follow-up (N = 1,030), completed a self-reported productivity measure (World Health Organization’s Health and Work Performance Questionnaire) at baseline and postintervention. Twenty-two percent of the participants lost a clinically meaningful amount of weight (≥5% weight loss). There were no statistically significant (p <.05) relationships between weight change from baseline to 12 months and change scores of absolute or relative absenteeism or for absolute or relative presenteeism. Within a modestly successful Internet-based, worksite weight loss intervention, weight loss did not improve self-reported absenteeism or presenteeism. Further studies are needed to explore the sensitivity of the World Health Organization’s Health and Work Performance Questionnaire and the long-term effects of weight loss on productivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)769-774
Number of pages6
JournalHealth Education and Behavior
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Keywords

  • productivity
  • worksite weight loss intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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