Domestic well water quality in rural Nebraska: Focus on nitrate-nitrogen, pesticides, and coliform bacteria

David C. Gosselin, Jacqueline Headrick, Rod Tremblay, Xun Hong Chen, Scott Summerside

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Domestic, rural water quality in Nebraska varies substantially from one ground water region to another and is a function of well characteristics, distances to potential contamination sources, and hydrogeologic and site characteristics. The percentage of well exceeding the 10 ppm MCL for NO3-N ranged from 3 to 39 percent, depending on the ground water region. This large range of values indicates the inadequacy of stating that an average of 19 percent of domestic wells in Nebraska are contaminated by nitrates. Bacterial contamination has either remained the same or has decreased. To improve the quality of domestic drinking water will require a combination of activities, including the application of best management practices specific to a ground water region and individual action at rural households, such as conducting surveys of existing wells before installing new wells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-87
Number of pages11
JournalGround Water Monitoring and Remediation
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Water Science and Technology

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