Dynamic Postural Stability in Active, Adolescent Males Following Repeated Bouts of Aerobic Exercise in Hot and Temperate Environments: A Pilot Study

Colin W. Bond, Jason C. Dorman, Lisa N. MacFadden, Thayne A. Munce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Proper jump-landing neuromuscular control is crucial in mitigating lower-extremity musculoskeletal injuries. The presence of fatigue, especially in extreme environments, may degrade dynamic postural stability (DPS) and result in lower-extremity injuries. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of moderate intensity exercise in hot (HOT) and temperate (TEMP) ambient temperatures and residual effects of a previous bout on DPS during a single-legged jump-landing. It was hypothesized that the participants would display worse DPS after HOT compared to TEMP. Methods: Six recreationally active young males (16.8 ± 0.7 year, 1.88 ± 0.12 m, 83.8 ± 19.8 kg) completed two, 60-minute bouts of exercise with 60 minutes of rest between bouts in both HOT (35°C) and TEMP (22.2°C). Heart rate and core body temperature (Tc) were monitored continuously, and DPS was assessed before and after each bout. Results: The DPS time and condition effects were not identified (p > 0.05), but HOT elicited some notable (d > 0.20) increases in heart rate, Tc, and DPS compared to TEMP. Conclusions: The DPS decrements varied between subjects suggesting individual-specific etiology. Repeated bouts of exercise in HOT may place an individual at a greater risk for injury than TEMP if proper prevention strategies are not used.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)368-375
Number of pages8
JournalMilitary medicine
Volume185
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 7 2020
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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