Effects of feeding Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium or serovar Choleraesuis on growth performance and circulating insulin-like growth factor-I, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-1β in weaned pigs

J. N. Fraser, B. L. Davis, K. A. Skjolaas, T. E. Burkey, S. S. Dritz, B. J. Johnson, J. E. Minton

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11 Scopus citations

Abstract

The most common Salmonella serovars causing clinical disease in pigs are Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium (Typhimurium) and Choleraesuis. Given that the swine host-adapted serovar Choleraesuis has been reported to cause systemic disease, a different disease outcome from that of Typhimurium, our working hypothesis was that this serovar would likely engage systemic immune-inflammatory mechanisms, resulting in elevated systemic cytokine secretion. Forty-eight weaned pigs were blocked by BW and sex, and randomly allotted to 1 of 3 treatments in a 14-d study. Each treatment had 8 replicates (pens), with 2 pigs/pen. The treatments consisted of a negative control and pigs repeatedly fed 108 cfu of Typhimurium or Choleraesuis. On d 0, the pigs were fed Choleraesuis or Typhimurium in dough balls, and the bacteria were refed twice weekly throughout the experiment. Control pigs received dough balls without bacteria. All pigs were housed in temperature-controlled rooms under constant lighting and were fed a standard corn-soybean meal-based nursery diet. Pig BW and feed disappearance were used to determine ADG, ADFI, and G:F. Rectal temperatures were obtained daily from 1 pig/ pen beginning 2 d before the first bacterial feeding through d 7 using rapid-response digital thermometers. Serum was collected on d 0, 7, and 14 from a single pig/ pen for analysis of IGF-I, tumor necrosis factor-α , and IL-1β. There was no change in the rectal temperature of the control or the Typhimurium-challenged pigs (compared with d 0) or when comparing Typhimuriumchallenged pigs with control animals. In contrast, pigs fed Choleraesuis had increased rectal temperatures beginning on d 2 and continuing through d 7 (P < 0.05), with the greatest elevation on d 3 (P < 0.001) compared with the control pigs. Average daily gain and ADFI of pigs challenged with Typhimurium did not differ from those of the control animals. Pigs fed Choleraesuis had a 25% reduction in ADG (P < 0.0001) and ADFI (P < 0.002) compared with the control pigs. On d 7, pigs fed Choleraesuis had reduced serum IGF-I compared with control (P < 0.01) or Typhimurium-challenged pigs (P = 0.01). Bacterial feeding did not affect serum tumor necrosis factor-α or IL-1β compared with control pigs at any time throughout the experiment. We conclude that repeated exposure of weaned pigs to Choleraesuis reduced growth performance in the absence of changes in systemic inflammatory cytokines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1161-1167
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume85
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

Keywords

  • Insulin-like growth factor-I
  • Interleukin-1β
  • Salmonella enterica
  • Swine
  • Tumor necrosis factor-α

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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