Effects of in utero and postnatal sodium saccharin exposure on the nutritional status of the young rat. II. Dose response and reversibility

E. M. Garland, R. Shapiro, P. L. Kraft, B. J. Mattson, J. M. Parr, S. M. Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

A previous study in our laboratory demonstrated that 30-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 7.5% sodium saccharin (NaS) since conception differ from untreated rats in several physiological parameters. In the present study, to determine the dose response of the changes associated with NaS treatment, animals were evaluated at 30 days post-birth, after treatment with dietary levels of 0, 1, 3 or 7.5% NaS since conception. Most physiological consequences of NaS treatment in the weanling rat, including anaemia and reductions in serum folate and vitamin A concentrations, were dose dependent. Serum vitamin E, cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were decreased at the two lower doses of NaS but were significantly increased with 7.5% NaS. The no-effect level (NOEL) was similar for physiological effects and for bladder tumour production in two-generation studies (1% NaS in the diet). The reversibility of the effects of 7.5% NaS was examined in 90-day-old rats. The increases in lipids and vitamin E were reversible. Although values for haematological parameters and serum vitamin A remained significantly reduced at 90 days, changes were less severe than at 30 days. Histological examinations revealed that the effects of 7.5% dietary NaS on the bladder were negligible, indicating that the physiological changes observed in the young rat are probably not directly related to the production of bladder tumours.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)669-679
Number of pages11
JournalFood and Chemical Toxicology
Volume29
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Toxicology

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