Effects of labor contractions on catecholamine release and breathing frequency in newborn rats

April E. Ronca, Patrick J. Ronan, Regina A. Abel, Kenneth J. Renner, Jeffrey R. Alberts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Plasma catecholamines in newborn rats (0-2 hr old) were analyzed following vaginal birth, cesarean section with simulated labor contractions, or cesarean section without labor contractions. Upon delivery, pups were exposed to key elements of the rat's natural birth process, that is, umbilical cord occlusion, tactile stimulation, and cooling. Only pups exposed to actual or simulated labor showed an immediate rise in norepinephrine and epinephrine. Initial postpartum respiratory frequencies were higher in vaginal than in cesarean delivered pups and, in all groups, inversely correlated with catecholamine titers, suggesting respiratory distress or transient tachypnea at lower catecholamine levels. These findings establish a rat model for analyzing effects of labor on neonatal adaptive response during the transition from prenatal to postnatal life. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1308-1314
Number of pages7
JournalBehavioral Neuroscience
Volume120
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006

Keywords

  • Birth
  • Epinephrine
  • Fetus
  • Norepinephrine
  • Respiration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of labor contractions on catecholamine release and breathing frequency in newborn rats'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this