Effects of self-generated noise on quiet threshold by transducer type in school-age children and adults

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Low-frequency detection thresholds in quiet vary across transducers. This experiment tested the hypothesis that transducer effects are larger in young children than adults, due to higher levels of self-generated noise in children. Method: Listeners were normal-hearing 4.6-to 11.7-year-olds and adults. Warble-tone detection was measured at 125, 250, 500, and 1000 Hz with a sound-field speaker, insert earphones, and supra-aural headphones. Probe microphone recordings measured self-generated noise levels. Results: Thresholds were similar across ages for speaker measurements. Transducer effects were larger for children than adults, with mean child–adult threshold differences at 125 Hz of 3.4 dB (insert earphones) and 6.6 dB (supra-aural headphones). Age effects on threshold were broadly consistent with noise levels measured in the ear canal. Conclusions: Self-generated noise appears to elevate children’s low-frequency thresholds measured with occluding transducers. These effects could be particularly relevant to the diagnosis of minimal and mild hearing loss in children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2027-2033
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume63
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

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