Efficacy of a combined food-response inhibition and attention training for weight loss

Eric Stice, Sonja Yokum, Timothy D. Nelson, Elliot Berkman, Harm Veling, Natalia Lawrence

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

This Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences article reviews trials that evaluated an obesity treatment that combines response-inhibition training with high-calorie foods and training designed to reduce attention for high-calorie foods. Two randomized controlled trials suggest that food-response inhibition and attention training produced significant body-fat loss, along with a reduction in valuation of, and reward-region response to, high-calorie foods. However, these effects did not emerge in a third trial, potentially because this trial used more heterogeneous food images, which reduced inhibition learning and attentional learning. Collectively, results suggest that food-response inhibition and attention training can devalue high-calorie foods and result in weight loss, but only if a homogeneous set of high-calorie and low-calorie food images is used.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101168
JournalCurrent Opinion in Behavioral Sciences
Volume46
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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