Enhanced peripheral dopamine impairs post-ischemic healing by suppressing angiotensin receptor type 1 expression in endothelial cells and inhibiting angiogenesis

Chandrani Sarkar, Ramesh K. Ganju, Vincent J. Pompili, Debanjan Chakroborty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Increased circulating catecholamines have been linked with cardiovascular anomalies as well as with peripheral vascular diseases. Although the roles of epinephrine and norepinephrine have received considerable attention, the role of the other catecholamine, dopamine, has been less studied. Since dopamine is a potent endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis and as angiogenesis is essential for ischemic healing, we therefore studied the role played by dopamine during ischemic healing using dopamine D2 receptor knockout (KOD2) mice. Although concentration of dopamine and its rate-limiting enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase, was considerably high in the muscle tissues of wild-type and KOD2 mice with unilateral hind limb ischemia (HLI), recovery was significantly faster in the KOD2 mice compared to the wild-type controls, thereby indicating that peripheral dopamine might have a role in this healing process. In addition, we observed significant differences in post-ischemic angiogenesis between these two groups. Our study further revealed that elevated dopamine independently suppressed activation of local tissue-based renin-angiotensin system (RAS), a critical growth factor system stimulating angiogenesis in ischemia. Angiotensin II (ATII) and its receptor, angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1R), are the key players in RAS-mediated angiogenesis. Dopamine acting through its D2 receptors in endothelial cells inhibited ATII-mediated angiogenesis by suppressing the expression of AT1R in these cells. This study thus for the first time demonstrates the role played by dopamine in prolonging post-ischemic recovery. Therefore, pharmacological intervention inhibiting the action of dopamine holds promise as future therapeutic strategy for the treatment of HLI and other peripheral arterial diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-107
Number of pages11
JournalAngiogenesis
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • Angiotensin II
  • Dopamine
  • Hind limb ischemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cancer Research

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