Ethnic comparisons in perceptions of health, happiness, hope, and related social determinants of health in a majority-minority midwestern town

Virginia Chaidez, Yumou Qiu, Angela Palmer-Wackerly, Julie A. Tippens, Gilbert R. Parra, Patrick Habecker, Kimberly Gocchi Carrasco, Jordan E Soliz, Lisa Marie Pytlik Zillig, Kirk Dombrowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In a rural Midwestern community sample (n=273), large proportions of Somalis and Whites ranked overall health as “Very good” (57% and 50%, respectively), while Hispanics (42%) considered it “Good”. Across all groups, most are either “Happy” or “Very happy” with their jobs—64%, 91%, 83%—or their families—85%, 93%, 91.6%—with reference to Hispanics, Somalis, and Whites, respectively. When asked, “In the past 30 days, how often did you feel hopeless?”, 83% of Somalis and two-thirds (67%) of Whites responded, “None of the time”, while half (50%) of Hispanics indicated the same. Overall, Hispanics appeared to be less healthy, happy, and hopeful than their White and Somali counterparts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number6
Pages (from-to)136-163
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Sociology and Social Welfare
Volume48
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Happiness
  • Hope
  • Rural immigration
  • Social determinants of health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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