Evaluating potential risks of food allergy of novel food sources based on comparison of proteins predicted from genomes and compared to www.AllergenOnline.org

Mohamed Abdelmoteleb, Chi Zhang, Brian Furey, Mark Kozubal, Hywel Griffiths, Marion Champeaud, Richard E. Goodman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Potential proteins from three novel food sources (Chlorella variabilis, Galdieria sulphuraria, and Fusarium strain flavolapis) were predicted from genomic sequences and were evaluated for potential risks of allergic cross-reactivity by comparing the predicted amino acid sequences against the allergens in the www.AllergenOnline.org (AOL) database. The preliminary analysis used CODEX Alimentarius limits of >35% identity over 80 amino acids to evaluate the predicted proteins which include many evolutionarily conserved proteins. Regulators might expect clinical serum IgE tests based on identity matches above the criteria if the proteins were introduced in genetically engineered crops. Some regulators have the same expectations for proteins in novel foods. To address the inequality of extensively conserved sequences, we compared the predicted proteins from curated genomes of 23 highly diverse allergenic species from animals, plants and arthropods as well as humans to AOL sequences and compiled identities. Identity matches greater than CODEX limits (>35% ID over 80 AA) are common for many proteins that are conserved through extensive evolution but are not predictive of published allergy risks based on observed taxonomic cross-reactivity. Therefore, we recommend changes in the allergen databases or methods of identifying matches for risk evaluation of new food sources. Our results provide critical data for redefining allergens in AOL or for providing guidance on more predictive sequence identity matches for risk assessment of possible risks of food allergy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number111888
JournalFood and Chemical Toxicology
Volume147
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Allergy
  • Bioinformatics
  • Chlorella
  • Cross-reactivity
  • Fusarium
  • Galdieria
  • Genome
  • Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Toxicology

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