Evaluating the effect of high-pressure processing in contrast to boiling on the antioxidant activity from alcalase hydrolysate of Great Northern Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris)

Madhurima Bandyopadhyay, Snigdha Guha, Michael J. Naldrett, Sophie Alvarez, Kaustav Majumder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Food processing can alter protein structure, modulate enzyme accessibility, and therefore the release of bioactive peptides. Thus, processing techniques, boiling, high-pressure processing (HPP), and a combination of both, were compared for their efficiency to release antioxidant peptides after alcalase hydrolysis of Great Northern Beans (GNBs). The oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) indicated that boiled hydrolysates had the highest antioxidant activity (370.9 ± 43.8 µmol TEAC/g). Mass spectrometry-based analysis suggested that di- and tri-peptide expression were significantly altered among the three treatments, and either Ile, Leu, Phe, and Arg containing peptides potentially contributed toward the enhanced antioxidant activity. Furthermore, the total phenolic content of the HPP-treated hydrolysate was higher than the other two treatments, with ferulic acid being the most prominent phenolic compound present in the bean hydrolysates. This study indicates that thermal processing such as boiling is more effective in modulating the release of antioxidant peptides. Practical applications: Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), such as Great Northern Beans (GNBs) are one of the major pulse crops in the United States. Storage proteins in beans can release peptides with biological activities after enzymatic hydrolysis. However, processing conditions can modulate the release of peptides. The present study is primarily focused on comparing the two processing methods, boiling and HPP, and their combination for the generation of peptides with potential antioxidant activity in alcalase-digested GNBs. Data from the study suggest that thermal treatment such as boiling is more effective in modulating the release of peptides from alcalase hydrolysate of GNBs with antioxidant activity. This is particularly important because over different cultures around the world, boiling is the most widely used processing method for the cooking of beans, and hence, these data also ensure that boiling is the most effective method in getting the most beneficial effects from the consumption of beans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere14004
JournalJournal of Food Biochemistry
Volume45
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Great Northern Beans (GNBs)
  • alcalase
  • antioxidant activity
  • boiling
  • high-pressure processing (HPP)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Biophysics
  • Pharmacology
  • Cell Biology

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