Evaluation of immunologic and intestinal effects in rats administered an E 171-containing diet, a food grade titanium dioxide (TiO2)

Lance K. Blevins, Robert B. Crawford, Anthony Bach, Michael D. Rizzo, Jiajun Zhou, Joseph E. Henriquez, D. M.Isha Olive Khan, Sera Sermet, Lora L. Arnold, Karen L. Pennington, Nathalia P. Souza, Samuel M. Cohen, Norbert E. Kaminski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The toxicity of dietary E 171, a food grade titanium dioxide was evaluated. A recent study reported rats receiving E 171 in water developed inflammation and aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, rats received food containing E 171 (7 or 100 days). The 100-day study included feeding E 171 after dimethylhydrazine (DMH) or vehicle only pretreatment. Food consumption was similar between treatment groups with maximum total cumulative E 171 exposure being 2617 mg/kg in 7 days and 29,400 mg/kg in 100 days. No differences were observed due to E 171 in the percentage of dendritic, CD4+ T or Treg cells within Peyer's patches or the periphery, or in cytokine production in plasma, sections of jejunum, and colon in 7- or 100-day E 171 alone fed rats. Differences were observed for IL-17A in colon (400 ppm E 171 + DMH) and IL-12p70 in plasma (40 ppm E 171 + DMH). E 171 had no effect on histopathologic evaluations of small and large intestines, liver, spleen, lungs, or testes, and no effects on ACF, goblet cell numbers, or colonic gland length. Dietary E 171 administration (7- or 100-day), even at high doses, produced no effect on the immune parameters or tissue morphology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number110793
JournalFood and Chemical Toxicology
Volume133
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2019

Keywords

  • Dietary titanium dioxide
  • E 171
  • Gastrointestinal inflammation
  • Intestinal carcinogenesis
  • T cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Toxicology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Evaluation of immunologic and intestinal effects in rats administered an E 171-containing diet, a food grade titanium dioxide (TiO<sub>2</sub>)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this