Examination of efficacious, efficient, and socially valid error-correction procedures to teach sight words and prepositions to children with autism spectrum disorder

Tiffany Kodak, Vincent Campbell, Samantha Bergmann, Brittany LeBlanc, Eva Kurtz-Nelson, Tom Cariveau, Shaji Haq, Patricia Zemantic, Jacob Mahon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prior research shows that learners have idiosyncratic responses to error-correction procedures during instruction. Thus, assessments that identify error-correction strategies to include in instruction can aid practitioners in selecting individualized, efficacious, and efficient interventions. The current investigation conducted an assessment to compare 5 error-correction procedures that have been evaluated in the extant literature and are common in instructional practice for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Results showed that the assessment identified efficacious and efficient error-correction procedures for all participants, and 1 procedure was efficient for 4 of the 5 participants. To examine the social validity of error-correction procedures, participants selected among efficacious and efficient interventions in a concurrent-chains assessment. We discuss the results in relation to prior research on error-correction procedures and current instructional practices for learners with ASD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)532-547
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of applied behavior analysis
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • assessment-based intervention
  • autism
  • error correction
  • preference assessment
  • prepositions
  • sight words
  • social validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Philosophy
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Applied Psychology

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