Familial Dyslexia: Use of Genetic Linkage Data to Define Subtypes

SHELLEY D. SMITH, BRUCE F. PENNINGTON, W. J. Kimberling, PAUL S. ING

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Specific reading disability is an example of a complex behavioral disorder which is clinically heterogeneous. It is probably also heterogeneous at the levels of etiology and process (pathogenesis), but there may not be a 1:1:1 mapping of etiology to process to clinical outcome. Thus, classification of cases by clinical features may not lead to discovery of the underlying processes or etiologies, and it may be profitable to define subgroups by etiology. There is evidence for genetic etiology in some cases, but there is genetic heterogeneity as well. Possible genetic models for specific reading disability include polygenic, oligogenic, and single gene inheritance, and there are several types of genetic analysis that can be used to determine which of these modes of inheritance may be present. Identification of individual genes is possible in single gene and oligogenic disorders. Clinical studies and molecular analysis can then be used to determine gene function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)204-213
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

Keywords

  • behavior genetics
  • dyslexia
  • linkage analysis
  • specific reading disability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Familial Dyslexia: Use of Genetic Linkage Data to Define Subtypes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this