First-time mothers' and fathers' transition to parenthood: Infant care self-efficacy, parenting satisfaction, and infant sex

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

111 Scopus citations

Abstract

The threefold purposes of our study were to determine differences between first-time mothers' and fathers' development of infant care self-efficacy and parenting satisfaction, relationships between mothers' and fathers' infant care self-efficacy and parenting satisfaction, and the effect of infant sex on the development of mothers' and fathers' infant care self-efficacy and parenting satisfaction during the first 4 months following the infant's birth. A convenience sample of 44 couples in a midwestern state completed the Demographic Questionnaire, the Infant Care Survey, and What Being the Parent of a New Baby is Like-Revised. Fathers' reports of infant care self-efficacy increased linearly during the first 4 months following the infant's birth while mothers' reports of infant care self-efficacy increased linearly during the first 3 months. At all data collection times, fathers reported significantly lower infant care self-efficacy than mothers. Reports of parenting satisfaction increased over time for mothers and fathers. At 8, 12, and 16 weeks following the infant's birth, mothers' infant care self-efficacy scores were significantly related to their parenting satisfaction scores. Fathers' infant care self-efficacy scores were significantly related to their parenting satisfaction scores at 12 and 16 weeks. Fathers of male infants had significantly higher parenting satisfaction scores than fathers of female infants at 12 and 16 weeks following the infant's birth. Nurses can develop individualized interventions to assist mothers and fathers during the transition to parenthood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-43
Number of pages13
JournalComprehensive Child and Adolescent Nursing
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics

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