From supervised to unsupervised exercise: Factors associated with exercise adherence

Miriam C. Morey, Patricia M. Dubbert, Martha E. Doyle, Helga MacAller, Gail M. Crowley, Maggie Kuchibhatla, Margaret Schenkman, Ronnie D. Horner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Getting older adults to initiate and maintain long-term exercise is an important public health mandate. This study is an analysis of a clinical trial of 112 sedentary adults, age 65-90 years, randomly assigned to 1 of 2 exercise interventions. We examined predictors and patterns of adherence of the 6-month home-based component of the trial. Telephone follow-up and diaries were used to assess adherence. Adherence to weekend exercise during the supervised phase of the program was the strongest predictor of subsequent home-based adherence. Adherence appeared stable throughout the intervention, indicating that adherence or nonadherence was established from the outset. The authors conclude that nonadherence can be identified early in the behavioral-change process. Future studies should focus on developing strategies for adults with chronic illnesses, depressive symptoms, and functional limitations who are nonadherent early on as they initiate and attempt to maintain exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-368
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Aging and Physical Activity
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2003
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Chronic disease
  • Comorbidity
  • Health behavior
  • Patient compliance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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