Gaps in survey data on cancer in American Indian and Alaska native populations: Examination of US population surveys, 1960-2010

Shinobu Watanabe-Galloway, Tinka Duran, Jim P. Stimpson, Corey Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction Population-based data are essential for quantifying the problems and measuring the progress made by comprehensive cancer control programs. However, cancer information specific to the American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) population is not readily available. We identified major population-based surveys conducted in the United States that contain questions related to cancer, documented the AI/AN sample size in these surveys, and identified gaps in the types of cancer-related information these surveys collect. Methods: We conducted an Internet query of US Department of Health and Human Services agency websites and a Medline search to identify population-based surveys conducted in the United States from 1960 through 2010 that contained information about cancer. We used a data extraction form to collect information about the purpose, sample size, data collection methods, and type of information covered in the surveys. Results: Seventeen survey sources met the inclusion criteria. Information on access to and use of cancer treatment, follow-up care, and barriers to receiving timely and quality care was not consistently collected. Estimates specific to the AI/AN population were often lacking because of inadequate AI/AN sample size. For example, 9 national surveys reviewed reported an AI/AN sample size smaller than 500, and 10 had an AI/AN sample percentage less than 1.5%. Conclusion: Continued efforts are needed to increase the overall number of AI/AN participants in these surveys, improve the quality of information on racial/ethnic background, and collect more information on treatment and survivorship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number120258
JournalPreventing Chronic Disease
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Gaps in survey data on cancer in American Indian and Alaska native populations: Examination of US population surveys, 1960-2010'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this