Geographic variation in attitudes regarding management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer

Logan R. McNeil, Alex B. Blair, Robert W. Krell, Chunmeng Zhang, Aslam Ejaz, Vincent P. Groot, Georgios Gemenetzis, James C. Padussis, Massimo Falconi, Christopher L. Wolfgang, Matthew J. Weiss, Chandrakanth Are, Jin He, Bradley N. Reames

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Recent literature suggests wide variations exist in the international management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. This study sought to evaluate how geography contributes to variations in management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods: An electronic survey investigating preferences for the evaluation and management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer was distributed to an international cohort of pancreatic surgeons. Surgeons were classified according to geographic location of practice, and survey responses were compared across locations. Results: A total of 153 eligible responses were received from 4 continents: North and South America (n = 94, 61.4%), Europe (n = 25, 16.3%), and Asia (n = 34, 22.2%). Preferences for the use and duration of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy varied widely. For example, participants in Asia commonly preferred 2 months of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (61.8%), whereas North and South American participants preferred 4 months (52.1%), and responses in Europe were mixed (P = .006). Participants in Asia were less likely to consider isolated liver or lung metastases contraindications to exploration and consequently had a greater propensity to consider exploration in a vignette of oligometastatic disease (56.7% vs North and South America: 25.6%, Europe: 43.5%; P = .007). Conclusion: In an international survey of pancreatic surgeons, attitudes regarding locally advanced pancreatic cancer and metastatic disease management varied widely across geographic locations. Better evidence is needed to define optimal management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-105
Number of pages9
JournalSurgery Open Science
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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