Girls’ interest in computing: Types and persistence

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper examines interest development through a longitudinal study of young women who had extensive middle school computer science experience. A repeated measures survey was conducted at the end of high school and results compared from the end of middle school to the end of high school. For girls who had developed an interest in a computing career by the end of middle school, interest in computing increased. Aspirational expressions of interest, defined as stating an interest in computing, were highly correlated while embodied expressions of interest, defined as engaging in computing activities such as classes, clubs, or hobbies were generally not correlated. Participants appeared more definite in their attitudes towards computing by the end of high school, particularly interest in computing as a career and college major, than they had at the end of middle school.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMaking a Difference
Subtitle of host publicationPrioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL - 12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL 2017 - Conference Proceedings
EditorsBrian K. Smith, Marcela Borge, Emma Mercier, Kyu Yon Lim
PublisherInternational Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Pages71-78
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9780990355007
StatePublished - 2017
Event12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning - Making a Difference: Prioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL, CSCL 2017 - Philadelphia, United States
Duration: Jun 18 2017Jun 22 2017

Publication series

NameComputer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL
Volume1
ISSN (Print)1573-4552

Conference

Conference12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning - Making a Difference: Prioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL, CSCL 2017
CountryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia
Period6/18/176/22/17

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Education

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  • Cite this

    Friend, M. (2017). Girls’ interest in computing: Types and persistence. In B. K. Smith, M. Borge, E. Mercier, & K. Y. Lim (Eds.), Making a Difference: Prioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL - 12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL 2017 - Conference Proceedings (pp. 71-78). (Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL; Vol. 1). International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS).