Hand instrument performance in a single site surgery simulator with novices

Jakeb D. Riggle, Emily E. Miller, Bernadette McCrory, Alex Meitl, Eric Lim, M. Susan Hallbeck, Chad A. LaGrange

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) is a new minimally invasive surgical technique that presents physical and mental challenges to surgeons. Currently, LESS procedures are commonly performed using surgical instruments designed for traditional multi-incision laparoscopic surgery. A pilot study was conducted to determine which laparoscopic instruments were the most efficient for LESS procedures. In a LESS surgical trainer, 24 novice users completed a simple surgical task using standard (non-articulating) straight laparoscopic graspers and two different articulating instruments. Task performance was scored based on completion time and the number of errors. Analyses showed that the use of the simpler straight instruments produced significantly faster times (p = 0.004 and p = 0.014) and higher task scores (p = 0.005 and p = 0.021) than the articulating instruments. These results suggest that standard laparoscopic hand instruments enable better novice performance for a basic LESS task.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2013
Pages1522-1526
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Event57th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting - 2013, HFES 2013 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Sep 30 2013Oct 4 2013

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Conference

Conference57th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting - 2013, HFES 2013
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period9/30/1310/4/13

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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  • Cite this

    Riggle, J. D., Miller, E. E., McCrory, B., Meitl, A., Lim, E., Hallbeck, M. S., & LaGrange, C. A. (2013). Hand instrument performance in a single site surgery simulator with novices. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2013 (pp. 1522-1526). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society). https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931213571339