Handgrip Strength Asymmetry Is Associated With Limitations in Individual Basic Self-Care Tasks

Sean J. Mahoney, Kyle J. Hackney, Donald A. Jurivich, Lindsey J. Dahl, Carol Johnson, Ryan McGrath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

This investigation sought to determine the associations between handgrip strength (HGS) asymmetries and limitations in individual activities of daily living (ADL). The analytic sample included 18,468 participants from the 2006 to 2016 waves of the Health and Retirement Study. Those with HGS >10% stronger on either hand had any HGS asymmetry. Individuals with HGS >10% stronger on their dominant or non-dominant hand had dominant or non-dominant HGS asymmetry, respectively. ADL abilities were self-reported. Those with any HGS asymmetry had 1.21 (95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.01–1.46]) greater odds for a toileting limitation and 1.25 (CI = [1.03–1.52]) greater odds for a transferring limitation. Individuals with dominant HGS asymmetry had 1.24 (CI = [1.01–1.53]) greater odds for a transferring limitation. Those with non-dominant HGS asymmetry had 1.39 (CI = [1.01–1.93]) and 1.44 (CI = [1.05–1.96]) greater odds for a bathing and toileting limitation, respectively. HGS asymmetries could help to identify future limitations in specific ADLs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)450-454
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Applied Gerontology
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • activities of daily living (ADLs)
  • disability
  • frailty
  • self-care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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