Healthcare costs and resource utilization associated with renal cell carcinoma among older Americans: A longitudinal case-control study using the SEER-Medicare data

Naleen Raj Bhandari, Hrishikesh P. Kale, Norman V. Carroll, Carrie McAdam-Marx, Songthip T. Ounpraseuth, J. Mick Tilford, Mohamed H. Kamel, Erin E. Kent, Nalin Payakachat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To determine 1-year and 5-year total healthcare costs and healthcare resource (HRU) associated with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in older Americans, from a healthcare sector perspective. Materials and methods: This was a longitudinal, retrospective cohort study using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results–Medicare linked data (2006–2014), which included older (≥66 years) patients with primary RCC and 1:5 matched noncancer controls. Patients/controls were followed from diagnosis (pseudo-diagnosis for controls) until death or up to loss-to-follow-up (censored). Per-patient average 1-year and 5-year cumulative total and incremental total healthcare costs and HRU were reported. Results: A total of 11,228 RCC patients were matched to 56,140 controls. Per-patient cumulative average 1-year (incremental = $38,291 [$36,417–$40,165]; $57,588 vs. $19,297) and 5-year (incremental = $68,004 [$55,123–$80,885]; $183,550 vs. $115,547) total costs (excluding prescription drug costs) were 3 and 1.6 times higher for RCC vs. controls. These estimates were 3.6 and 1.7 times higher for RCC vs. controls when prescription costs were included in total costs. Prescription drug costs accounted for 8.4% (incremental = $3,715) and 18.1% (incremental = $15,375) of the 1-year and 5-year incremental total costs, respectively. RCC patients had greater cumulative number of hospitalizations, emergency department visits and prescriptions in 1- and 5-years, compared to controls. Conclusions: Average first year total cost for a patient with incident diagnosis of RCC is substantially higher than that for controls and it varies depending on the stage at diagnosis. Study findings could help in planning future resource allocation and in determining research and unmet needs in this patient population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347.e17-347.e27
JournalUrologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations
Volume40
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2022

Keywords

  • Economic burden
  • Healthcare costs
  • Healthcare resource use
  • Medicare
  • RCC

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Urology

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