Home range, movement, and site fidelity of translocated northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) in southwest Georgia, USA

Theron M. Terhune, D. Clay Sisson, H. Lee Stribling, John P. Carroll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

During 1997 and 1998, we compared home range, movement, and site fidelity characteristics of translocated wild northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) to resident birds using radiotelemetry. We captured wild bobwhites (n=74) in southwest Georgia, USA just before the breeding season and relocated them (>1.6 km from capture sites) to sites nearby where previous density estimates revealed that populations were low compared to surrounding areas. Translocated birds were equipped with radiotransmitters and released in groups of 8 to 12. Resident birds (n=166) were also captured and simultaneously monitored via radiotelemetry. We found no difference in home range size (F1=0.08, P=0.78), mean daily movements (F1=0.04, P=0.84), or distance moved from trap or release sites to arithmetic centers of home ranges (F 1=1.58, P=0.21) between translocated and resident bobwhites. These results suggest that translocating wild bobwhites over relatively short distances into suitable habitat does not negatively influence bobwhite movement and renders site fidelity as reasonable. Therefore, translocation of wild bobwhites before breeding season can result in enhanced numbers of adult breeders in a target location and potentially augments fall populations via reproductive yield.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-124
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Wildlife Research
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Breeding season
  • Daily movement
  • Quail
  • Relocate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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