Immediate and Subsequent Effects of Matched and Unmatched Stimuli on Targeted Vocal Stereotypy and Untargeted Motor Stereotypy

John T. Rapp, Greg Swanson, Stephanie M. Sheridan, Kimberly A. Enloe, Diana Maltese, Lisa A. Sennott, Lauren Shrader, Regina A. Carroll, Sarah M. Richling, Ethan S. Long, Marc J. Lanovaz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors evaluated the effects of matched and unmatched stimuli on immediate and subsequent engagement in targeted vocal stereotypy (Experiment 1) and untargeted motor stereotypy (Experiment 2). Results of Experiment 1 showed that (a) matched stimulation decreased immediate engagement in vocal stereotypy for 8 of 11 participants and increased subsequent engagement in vocal stereotypy for only 1 of the 8 participants and (b) unmatched stimulation decreased immediate engagement in vocal stereotypy for only 1 of 10 participants and did not increase subsequent engagement in vocal stereotypy for this participant. Results of Experiment 2 showed that for 8 of 14 participants, untargeted stereotypy increased when the matched or unmatched stimulus was present, after it was removed, or both. The authors briefly discuss the potential clinical implications of using matched stimulation to decrease vocal stereotypy and limitations of the findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)543-567
Number of pages25
JournalBehavior Modification
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

Keywords

  • automatic reinforcement
  • matched stimuli
  • multiple schedule
  • unmatched stimuli
  • untargeted stereotypy
  • vocal stereotypy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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