Immigration and rural America: Latinos' perceptions of work and residence in three meatpacking communities

Rochelle L. Dalla, Amy Ellis, Sheran C. Cramer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Immigration is changing the face of rural America. Stable, year-round employment in the food-processing industry is the most significant factor attracting immigrants into the rural Midwest. Much has been published documenting social and economic changes in rural communities following surges in immigration in rural meat-processing communities. The purpose of the present investigation was to examine immigrants' perceptions of work and residence in rural America. To this end, personal interviews were conducted with 43 immigrants residing in three Nebraska meatpacking communities. Participants described routes of immigration and motivations for international movement, work in the packing plants, and rural residence. Work for future investigators and the role of policy and social service professionals are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-185
Number of pages23
JournalCommunity, Work and Family
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2005

Keywords

  • Immigration
  • Meat-processing work
  • Residence
  • Rural midwest

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)

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