Immune response to revaccination with meningococcal A and C polysaccharides in Gambian children following repeated immunisation during early childhood

Jenny MacLennan, Stephen Obaro, Jonathan Deeks, Derrick Williams, Lorna Pais, George Carlone, Richard Moxon, Brian Greenwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

107 Scopus citations

Abstract

Forty-two Gambian children randomised to receive two doses of meningococcal A/C polysaccharide vaccine (MPS) in infancy and either MPS (n = 15), meningococcal A/C conjugate (n = 13) or inactivated polio vaccine (IPV n = 14) at 2 years, were revaccinated with MPS at 5 years of age along with 39 matched control children. Meningococcal A and C polysaccharide antibodies were analysed by ELISA and bactericidal assay (SBA) in sera taken before and 10 days after revaccination. The geometric mean group SBA titre in the MPS group following revaccination was about half that of the unvaccinated controls (0.51 95% CI: 0.28, 0.90) for group A and less than half that of the controls for group C (0.41, 95% CI: 0.16, 1.03 P = 0.06). The group C SBA response in the conjugate group was 14-fold higher than in the MPS group (P < 0.001). Multiple doses of meningococcal polysaccharide in childhood may therefore attenuate the SBA response to both group A and group C polysaccharides. In contrast, vaccination with meningococcal A/C conjugate after MPS in infancy gives immunological memory to N. meningitidis group C.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3086-3093
Number of pages8
JournalVaccine
Volume17
Issue number23-24
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 6 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Meningococcus
  • Polysaccharide vaccine
  • Tolerance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • General Immunology and Microbiology
  • General Veterinary
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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