Impact of dietary fiber fermentation from cereal grains on metabolite production by the fecal microbiota from normal weight and obese individuals

Junyi Yang, Ali Keshavarzian, Devin J. Rose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Gut bacteria may influence obesity through the metabolites produced by dietary fiber fermentation (mainly, short-chain fatty acids [SCFA]). Five cereal grain samples (wheat, rye, maize [corn], rice, and oats) were subjected to in vitro digestion and fermentation using fecal samples from 10 obese and nine normal weight people. No significant differences in total SCFA production between the normal weight and obese groups were observed [279 (12) vs. 280 (12), mean (standard error), respectively; P=.935]. However, the obese microbiota resulted in elevated propionate production compared with that of normal weight [24.8(2.2) vs. 17.8(1.9), respectively; P=.008]. Rye appeared to be particularly beneficial among grain samples due to the lowest propionate production and highest butyrate production during fermentation. These data suggest that the dietary fibers from cereal grains affect bacterial metabolism differently in obese and normal weight classes and that certain grains may be particularly beneficial for promoting gut health in obese states.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)862-867
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Medicinal Food
Volume16
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

Keywords

  • Butyrate
  • Corn
  • Grains
  • Gut microbiota
  • Maize
  • Oats
  • Propionate
  • Rice
  • Rye
  • Short-chain fatty acids
  • Wheat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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