Impact of lower urinary tract symptoms on work productivity in female workers: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Kuan Yin Lin, Ka Chun Siu, Kuan Han Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims: The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the impact of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) on work productivity in female workers. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted using eight electronic databases (MEDLINE, PEDro, CINAHL, Cochrane library, EMBASE, PubMed, Scopus, and PsycINFO) to identify articles published before July 2017 that studied the work productivity in female workers with LUTS. Two reviewers independently assessed the quality of studies using the Joanna Briggs Institute. Meta-analyses were performed on studies having measured work productivity between females with and without LUTS, and odds ratios (ORs) or the mean differences were used. Results: Fourteen articles (n = 48 223 females) were included in the review, and meta-analyses were performed with six of those articles. Lower urinary tract symptoms were significantly associated with work productivity loss (OR = 1.11, 95%CI = 1.06-1.15), presenteeism (OR = 1.10, 95%CI = 1.05-1.14), and activity impairment (OR = 1.11, 95%CI = 1.09-1.14). However, there was no significant difference in the probability of absenteeism between females with and without LUTS (OR = 1.03, 95%CI = 0.94-1.13). Conclusions: Evidence suggests that female workers with LUTS had significantly greater work productivity impairment compared to those without LUTS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2323-2334
Number of pages12
JournalNeurourology and Urodynamics
Volume37
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2018

Keywords

  • absenteeism
  • overactive bladder
  • presenteeism
  • urinary incontinence
  • work

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Urology

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