Impact of slow versus rapid digesting carbohydrates on substrate oxidation in pre-pubertal children: A randomized crossover trial

Zachary M. Gillen, Vikkie A. Mustad, Marni E. Shoemaker, Brianna D. Mckay, Todd J. Leutzinger, Jose M. Lopez-Pedrosa, Ricardo Rueda, Joel T. Cramer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background & aims: Consumption of rapid digesting sugars by children are under increased scrutiny because of their contribution to unhealthy weight gain. Previous studies in adults and children have suggested that altering the blend of carbohydrates (CHOs) consumed may cause shifts in substrate utilization. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of consuming a slow digesting carbohydrate (SDC) and rapid digesting carbohydrate (RDC) on CHO and fat oxidation, glucose, and insulin responses at rest, during exercise, and post-exercise rest in pre-pubescent children. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, crossover design was used. Nineteen pre-pubescent children (n = 10 boys, n = 9 girls, mean ± standard error, age = 9.84 ± 0.37-yrs) participated. Visits to the laboratory began with a 30-min measurement of resting metabolism followed by consumption of either an RDC or SDC drink. Postprandial resting metabolism was recorded for 60-min, immediately followed by 60-min of submaximal cycling exercise while metabolism was recorded, which was immediately followed by another 60-min recording of post-exercise metabolism. Total CHO and fat oxidation, endogenous and exogenous CHO oxidation, blood glucose, and insulin were assessed. Results: Total CHO oxidation rate (g∙min−1) was greater after the RDC drink at 60 min (p = 0.032). Endogenous CHO oxidation rate (g∙min−1) was greater after the SDC drink at 15 min (p ≤ 0.010). Cumulative endogenous CHO oxidation (g) was greater after the SDC drink at 45 min (p = 0.009). Endogenous CHO oxidation accounted for a greater proportion of substrate oxidation after the first 60-min rest period (p = 0.028), while exogenous CHO oxidation accounted for a greater proportion of substrate oxidation for the RDC at all time points (p ≤ 0.019). Conclusions: The present study provides novel data suggesting that an SDC promotes greater endogenous substrate utilization in pre-pubertal children, which may have beneficial health impacts on energy intake and carbohydrate regulation/metabolism during growth and development. Clinical trials registry number: NCT03185884, clinicaltrials.gov

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3718-3728
Number of pages11
JournalClinical Nutrition
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Carbohydrate oxidation
  • Children
  • Endogenous
  • Exogenous
  • Fat oxidation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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