Implanted Port Access in the Emergency Department: A Unit-Level Feasibility Study of a Nurse-Led Port Access Algorithm

Theresa A. Jizba, Jennifer M. Baumert, Jennifer Miller, Susan Barnason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: The objective of this study was to determine the impact of an emergency nurse-led implanted port access algorithm for ED patients with implanted ports admitted to the hospital. Methods: A feasibility study evaluated the implementation of a central line-associated bloodstream infection algorithm in the emergency department over a 1-month study period. Emergency nurses received central line-associated bloodstream infection education and training for port access algorithm implementation. Pre- and postimplementation surveys measured the nurses’ knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding central line-associated bloodstream infections. The nurses’ perceptions of the algorithm were assessed pre- and postimplementation. ED patient port access and central line-associated bloodstream infection rates were compared with preimplementation rates. Results: Emergency nurses (N = 32) received central line-associated bloodstream infection education and algorithm training. Pre- and postimplementation as well as knowledge, attitude, and behavior surveys were completed by 59% (n = 19) of the nursing staff. Knowledge regarding central line-associated bloodstream infections significantly improved, t (19) = –4.8, P < .001. The nurses’ pre- and postimplementation attitude and behavior scores did not differ significantly. They expressed no concerns regarding implementation of the algorithm; 89% (n = 17) reported that the algorithm “fit well” with the ED workflow, and 21% (n = 4) integrated the patient's decision regarding venous access into their shift report. The ED port access incidence during the study period was 17.6% (n = 3), compared with 83.3% (n = 15) in the month before the study. Discussion: The emergency nurse-led port access algorithm decreased ED port access rates. The nurses’ pre- and postimplementation knowledge of central line-associated bloodstream infections increased. The emergency nurse-led port access algorithm empowered emergency nurses to educate their patients on implanted port access and decreased central line use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)599-608
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Emergency Nursing
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

Keywords

  • Central line-associated bloodstream infection
  • Central venous access
  • Emergency department
  • Implanted port

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency

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