In vitro and in situ characterization of arthroscopic loop security and knot security of braided polyblend sutures: a biomechanical study

Lucas C. Armstrong, Alexander Chong, Ryan W. Livermore, Daniel J. Prohaska, Amanda N. Doyon, Paul H. Wooley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

We conducted a study to evaluate biomechanical performance during destructive testing of several different suture materials in various arthroscopic knot configurations under both in vitro and in situ conditions. Surgeons of different levels of experience tied the knots. Three different arthroscopic knots (static surgeon's, Weston, Tennessee slider) with 3 reverse half-hitches on alternating posts were tested using Fiberwire, ForceFiber, Orthocord, and Ultrabraid suture materials under both in vitro and in situ (blood plasma at 37°C) conditions. Three surgeons of different experience levels tied the knots on a post 30 mm in circumference. A single load-to-failure test was performed. There were no significant in vitro-in situ differences for Ultrabraid in the different knot configurations or with the different experience levels. Surgeon B (intermediate experience) showed no significant differences between test conditions for any knot configuration or suture material. With Tennessee slider knots, surgeon C (least experience) showed significantly lower clinical failure load under both test conditions and had a higher percentage of complete knot slippage. Surgeon B had no knot slippage with use of Fiberwire. Both the aqueous environment and the surgeon's familiarity with certain knots have an effect on knot security.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-182
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.)
Volume44
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'In vitro and in situ characterization of arthroscopic loop security and knot security of braided polyblend sutures: a biomechanical study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this