In-vivo validation of spatially correct three-dimensional reconstruction of human coronary arteries by integrating intravascular ultrasound and biplane angiography

George D. Giannoglou, Yiannis S. Chatzizisis, George Sianos, Dimitrios Tsikaderis, Antonis Matakos, Vassilios Koutkias, Panagiotis Diamantopoulos, Nicos Maglaveras, George E. Parcharidis, George E. Louridas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The in-vivo validation of geometrically correct three-dimensional reconstruction of human coronary arteries by integrating intravascular ultrasound and biplane coronary angiography has not been adequately investigated. The purpose of this study was to describe the reconstruction method and investigate its in-vivo feasibility and accuracy. METHODS: In 17 coronary arteries (mean length, 85.7±17.1 mm) from nine patients, an intravascular ultrasound procedure along with a biplane coronary angiography was performed. From each angiographic projection, a single end-diastolic frame was selected in order to reconstruct the intravascular ultrasound catheter trajectory in space. In each end-diastolic intravascular ultrasound image, the lumen and media-adventitia contours were detected semi-automatically by an active contour algorithm. Each pair of contours was located on the catheter trajectory appropriately and interpolated with the adjacent pairs creating a three-dimensional volume of the arterial lumen and wall. The reconstructed lumen was back-projected onto both angiographic planes and the agreement between the back-projected and the angiographic luminal outlines was calculated. RESULTS: The angiogram-derived catheter length showed very high correlation (y=0.97x+1.8, P<0.001) and agreement with the corresponding pullback-derived values. Accordingly, the semi-automated segmentation of intravascular ultrasound images was also in significant correlation (r≥0.96, P<0.001) and agreement with the reference manual tracing. The back-projected luminal borders showed good overall association with the corresponding angiographic ones (r=0.78, P<0.001) as well as remarkable agreement. CONCLUSIONS: Spatially correct three-dimensional reconstruction of human coronary arteries constitutes an imaging method with considerably high in-vivo feasibility and accuracy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)533-543
Number of pages11
JournalCoronary Artery Disease
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006

Keywords

  • Angiography
  • Coronary artery
  • Imaging
  • Three-dimensional
  • Ultrasonics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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