Incentives in service level agreement establishment the case of economic and social aspects

Wibke Michalk, Christian Haas

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Web has changed remarkably over the last years. From sharing data and computational power, these days, a trend towards social networks that allow for recognizing social context can be observed. Social aspects impose new challenges on collaborations over the internet and the affected parties. Currently, in the context of service provisioning over the internet, so called Service Level Agreements (SLAs) enforce the adherence to an agreed level of quality by means of penalties. In the context of social networks, different aspects than just monetary incentives need to be considered when designing penalties. Therefore, this paper investigates on the difference between common economic settings and settings with a social context and finally, requirements on the negotiation of agreements in social networks are derived. Hence, this paper's main contribution is to identify differences between purely economic and socio-economic aspects of agreements and to derive further research directions from the identified gaps.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2011 1st International Workshop on Requirements Engineering for Social Computing, RESC'11
Pages30-33
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event2011 1st International Workshop on Requirements Engineering for Social Computing, RESC'11 - Trento, Italy
Duration: Aug 29 2011Aug 29 2011

Publication series

Name2011 1st International Workshop on Requirements Engineering for Social Computing, RESC'11

Conference

Conference2011 1st International Workshop on Requirements Engineering for Social Computing, RESC'11
CountryItaly
CityTrento
Period8/29/118/29/11

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software

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