Incidence rates of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in US states are associated with residential radon levels

Gary G. Schwartz, Marilyn G. Klug

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aim: Environmental risk factors for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have not been consistently identified. An etiologic role for ionizing radiation in CLL is controversial. Because most of the ionizing radiation to which individuals are exposed comes from radon at home, we examined CLL incidence rates in relation to residential radon levels. Methods: We used population-based rates for CLL for US states from 2007 to 2011 and measurements of residential radon made by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Results: Incidence rates for CLL were significantly correlated with residential radon levels among whites (both genders together and each gender separately; p < 0.005) and among blacks (p < 0.05). Conclusion: We speculate that radon increases CLL risk and that the mechanisms may be similar to those by which radon causes lung cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-174
Number of pages10
JournalFuture Oncology
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2016

Keywords

  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia
  • Epidemiology
  • Geography
  • Incidence
  • Ionizing radiation
  • Radon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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