Incorporating biomechanical research topics into K-12 classroom design projects to broaden participation and increase engineering interest

Brandi N. Briggs, Benjamin S. Terry, Janet Yowell, Stephanie Rivale

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper describes a successful new biomechanical engineering curriculum created and implemented in two highly diverse local high schools by two graduate TEAMS (Tomorrow's Engineers⋯ creAte. iMagine. Succeed.) Fellows. In the semester-long curriculum, students create robotic surgical devices to diagnose and biopsy endometriosis, a pathology that afflicts roughly 5% of the adult female population. Curriculum focusing on anatomy, physiology, and tissue mechanics was also included to enhance the students' understanding of the human body and its response to engineering materials. Focusing this course on cutting-edge, biomechanical research that explicitly and authentically illustrates how engineering benefits society resulted in increased enrollment in engineering by underrepresented populations. This paper also discusses personal reflections by the two graduate Fellows of the benefits gained and lessons learned during the design and implementation of this innovative high school curriculum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEngineering Education and Professional Development
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
Pages333-341
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)9780791854914
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
EventASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2011 - Denver, CO, United States
Duration: Nov 11 2011Nov 17 2011

Publication series

NameASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2011
Volume5

Conference

ConferenceASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2011
CountryUnited States
CityDenver, CO
Period11/11/1111/17/11

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering

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    Briggs, B. N., Terry, B. S., Yowell, J., & Rivale, S. (2011). Incorporating biomechanical research topics into K-12 classroom design projects to broaden participation and increase engineering interest. In Engineering Education and Professional Development (pp. 333-341). (ASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2011; Vol. 5). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/imece2011-64530