Increased Cell Proliferation as a Key Event in Chemical Carcinogenesis: Application in an Integrated Approach for the Testing and Assessment of Non-Genotoxic Carcinogenesis

Christian Strupp, Marco Corvaro, Samuel M. Cohen, J. Christopher Corton, Kumiko Ogawa, Lysiane Richert, Miriam N. Jacobs

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

In contrast to genotoxic carcinogens, there are currently no internationally agreed upon regulatory tools for identifying non-genotoxic carcinogens of human relevance. The rodent cancer bioassay is only used in certain regulatory sectors and is criticized for its limited predictive power for human cancer risk. Cancer is due to genetic errors occurring in single cells. The risk of cancer is higher when there is an increase in the number of errors per replication (genotoxic agents) or in the number of replications (cell proliferation-inducing agents). The default regulatory approach for genotoxic agents whereby no threshold is set is reasonably conservative. However, non-genotoxic carcinogens cannot be regulated in the same way since increased cell proliferation has a clear threshold. An integrated approach for the testing and assessment (IATA) of non-genotoxic carcinogens is under development at the OECD, considering learnings from the regulatory assessment of data-rich substances such as agrochemicals. The aim is to achieve an endorsed IATA that predicts human cancer better than the rodent cancer bioassay, using methodologies that equally or better protect human health and are superior from the view of animal welfare/efficiency. This paper describes the technical opportunities available to assess cell proliferation as the central gateway of an IATA for non-genotoxic carcinogenicity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number13246
JournalInternational journal of molecular sciences
Volume24
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2023

Keywords

  • carcinogenicity
  • hazard assessment
  • mitogenicity
  • molecular targets
  • new approach methods (NAMs)
  • non-genotoxic carcinogens
  • regenerative proliferation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Spectroscopy
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry

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