Informant report of practical judgment ability in a clinical sample of older adults with subjective cognitive decline, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia

Laura A. Rabin, Crystal G. Guayara-Quinn, Caroline O. Nester, Liam Ellis, Nadia Paré

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite the importance of capturing problems with judgment and decision-making during neuropsychological evaluations of older adults, there are a limited number of validated measures and no informant rating scales. We developed an informant measure that captures compromised judgment related to safety, medical, financial, and social-ethical issues After item refinement and piloting in a memory disorders clinic, we utilized the Test of Practical Judgment-Informant (TOP-J-Informant) at two clinics in the Midwestern U.S., including 189 patient/informant dyads (mean age = 79.0, median years of education = 13, % female = 67.7) with various preclinical and clinical dementia conditions. We found psychometric support, including evidence for convergent, divergent, and criterion-related validity, and internal consistency. Importantly, we were able to discriminate between diagnostic groups in the expected direction. The TOP-J-Informant is brief (<5 minutes), easy to administer, and can reveal areas of concern related to poor judgment when administered in the context of a neuropsychological evaluation or clinic visit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • informant report
  • instrument validation
  • Judgment
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • neuropsychological assessment
  • older adults
  • questionnaire
  • Test of Practical Judgment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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