Integrating the Principles of Effective Intervention into Batterer Intervention Programming: The Case for Moving Toward More Evidence-Based Programming

Dana L. Radatz, Emily M. Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

The majority of batterer intervention program (BIP) evaluations have indicated they are marginally effective in reducing domestic violence recidivism. Meanwhile, correctional programs used to treat a variety of offenders (e.g., substance users, violent offenders, and so forth) that adhere to the “principles of effective intervention” (PEI) have reported significant reductions in recidivism. This article introduces the PEI—the principles on which evidence-based practices in correctional rehabilitation are based—and identifies the degree to which they are currently integrated into BIPs. The case is made that batterer programs could be more effective if they incorporate the PEI. Recommendations for further integration of the principles into BIPs are also provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-87
Number of pages16
JournalTrauma, Violence, and Abuse
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Keywords

  • batterer intervention programs
  • correctional rehabilitation
  • domestic violence
  • evidence-based practices
  • principles of effective intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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