Irrigated agriculture in an era of high energy prices

K. Schoengold, T. Sproul, D. Zilberman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rising energy prices will alter water allocation and distribution. Water extraction and conveyance will become more costly and demand for hydroelectric power will grow. The higher cost of energy will substantially increase the cost of groundwater, whereas increasing demand for hydroelectric power may reduce the price and increase supply of surface water. High energy prices and geopolitical considerations drive investment in land- and water-intensive biofuel technology, diverting land and water supplies to energy production at the expense of food production. Thus, rising energy prices will alter the allocation of water, increase the price of food and may have negative distributional effects. The impact of rising energy prices and the introduction of biofuels can be partly offset by the development and adoption of new technologies, including biotechnology. The models considered here can be used to determine the effects of rising energy prices on inputs, outputs, allocation decisions and impact on distribution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSustainable Irrigation Management, Technologies and Policies II
PublisherWITPress
Pages53-61
Number of pages9
Volume112
ISBN (Print)9781845641160
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Event2nd International Conference on Sustainable Irrigation Management, Technologies and Policies, Sustainable Irrigation 2008 - Alicante, Spain
Duration: Jun 11 2008Jun 14 2008

Conference

Conference2nd International Conference on Sustainable Irrigation Management, Technologies and Policies, Sustainable Irrigation 2008
Country/TerritorySpain
CityAlicante
Period6/11/086/14/08

Keywords

  • Biofuels
  • Conveyance
  • Groundwater
  • Surface water
  • Water price

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)

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