Is age at symptom onset associated with severity of memory impairment in adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder?

A. Henin, C. R. Savage, S. L. Rauch, T. Deckersbach, S. Wilhelm, L. Baer, M. W. Otto, M. A. Jenike

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Age at onset is a potentially important marker for neurobiological features of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This study examined the relationship between age at symptom onset and memory impairment in adults with OCD. Method: The authors used the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test and the California Verbal Learning Test to compare memory functioning of 37 adult OCD patients with self-reported childhood onset of symptoms (onset at less than 18 years of age) with that of 31 patients with adult-onset symptoms. Results: No differences were found between the two groups on any of the verbal and nonverbal memory measures. Conclusions: Self-reported age at symptom onset is not associated with memory performance in adult patients with OCD according to tests previously found to be sensitive to frontal-striatal system dysfunction and impairment in OCD. Such dysfunction appears to be a consistent feature of OCD in adults, regardless of age at initial symptom onset.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-139
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume158
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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