Is household smoking status associated with expenditure on food at restaurants, alcohol, gambling and insurance? Results from the 1998-99 household expenditure survey, Australia

M. Siahpush, R. Borland, M. Scollo

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aim: To examine how household expenditure on food at restaurants, alcohol, gambling and insurance vary between smoking and non-smoking households. Design: Cross sectional survey of households from private dwellings, conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), using a stratified multistage area sample design. Setting: Australia, 1998-99. Participants: Nationally representative sample of households (n = 6892). Main outcome measures: Expenditure on meals at restaurants, alcohol, alcoholic beverages at licensed premises, gambling, and insurance. Results: The odds of reporting expenditure on restaurant food and health insurance were 20% and 40% smaller for smoking than non-smoking households, respectively. The odds of reporting expenditure on alcohol (not including expenditure at licensed premises), drinking at licensed premises, and gambling were 100%, 50%, and 40% greater for smoking than for non-smoking households, respectively. Conclusions: The study suggests that smokers are more likely to engage in risky behaviour. Implementing smoking bans in licensed premises and gambling venues can provide an opportunity to reduce smoking prevalence. Quitting or cutting down smoking can provide opportunities for expenditure on other products or services, and enhance standards of living.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)409-414
Number of pages6
JournalTobacco control
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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