Leveraging Existing and Soon-to-Be-Available Novel Diagnostics for Optimizing Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship in Patients with Respiratory Tract Infections

Kelly A. Cawcutt, Robin Patel, Jeff Gerber, Angela M. Caliendo, Sara E. Cosgrove, Elizabeth Dodds Ashley, Piero Garzaro, Melissa Miller, Ebbing Lautenbach, Ritu Banerjee, Sarah E. Boyd, Mark H. Ebell, Thomas M. File, Erin H. Graf, Sara C. Keller, Sophia Koo, Daniel J. Livorsi, Larissa May, Rebekah Moehring, Frederick (Rick) NolteBenjamin Pinsky, Julie Szymczak, Tristan Timbrook, Ephraim Tsalik, Abinash Virk, Amanda Jezek, Jaclyn Levy, Rachel Zetts, Lauri Hicks, Joanna Wiecek, Rick Nettles, James Wittek, Patrick Murray, Christine Ginocchio

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) drive many outpatient encounters and, despite being predominantly viral, are associated with high rates of antibiotic prescriptions. With rising antibacterial resistance, optimization of prescribing of antibiotics in outpatients with RTIs is a critical need. Fortunately, this challenge arises at a time of increasing availability of novel RTI diagnostics to help discern which patients have bacterial infections warranting treatment. Effective implementation of antibiotic stewardship is needed, but optimal approaches for ambulatory settings are unknown. Future research needs are reviewed in this summary of a research summit convened by the Infectious Diseases Society of America in the fall of 2019.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E1115-E1121
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume72
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2021

Keywords

  • antibiotic stewardship
  • antibiotics
  • outpatient
  • respiratory infections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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