Living donor age and kidney allograft half-life: Implications for living donor paired exchange programs

Peter Chang, Jagbir Gill, James Dong, Caren Rose, Howard Yan, David Landsberg, Edward H. Cole, John S. Gill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and objectives Living donor paired exchange programs assume that kidneys from living donors are of comparable quality and anticipated longevity. This study determined actual allograft t 1/2 within different recipient age groups (10-year increments) as a function of donor age (5-year increments), and juxtaposed these results against the probabilities of deceased donor transplantation, and exclusion fromtransplantation (death or removal from the wait-list). Design, setting, participants, & measurements Data from the US Renal Data System (transplant dates 1988-2003 with follow-up through September 2007)were used to determine allograft t 1/2, whereas data from patients on the United Network for Organ Sharing waiting list between 2003 and 2005 (with follow-up through February 2010) were used to determine wait-list outcomes. Results With the exception of recipients aged 18-39 years, who had the best outcomes with donors aged 18-39 years, living donor age between 18 and 64 years had minimal effect on allograft t 1/2 (difference of 1-2 yearswith no graded association). The probability of deceased donor transplantation after 3 years of wait-listing ranged from 21% to 66% by blood type and level of sensitization, whereas the probability of being excluded from transplantation ranged from 6% to 27% by age, race, and primary renal disease. Conclusions With the exception of recipients aged 18-39 years, living donor age between 18 and 64 years has minimal effect on allograft survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)835-841
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Nephrology
  • Transplantation

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