Low Rates of Lung Cancer Screening Referrals in Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus: A Correlational Study

Wilfredo Lopez, Harlan Sayles, Sara H. Bares, Nada Fadul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

People living with HIV (PLWH) have an increased risk of lung cancer compared to the general population. In 2013, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released their lung cancer screening (LCS) guidelines. However, the impact of these guidelines has not been well established in PLWH. The objective of this retrospective descriptive study is to evaluate the frequency of lung cancer screening referrals and factors associated with LCS referrals using the 2013 USPSTF screening guidelines in at-risk PLWH. We collected demographic and clinical information on PLWH from electronic medical records from July 2016 to July 2018. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, t-tests, Wilcoxon rank sum tests, and Fisher’s exact tests were used for analysis. Only 14% of patients who met 2013 USPSTF screening guidelines were referred for screening. Patients who received a referral were more likely to have received tobacco cessation counseling. Patients who received and completed a referral were more likely to have hepatitis C infection. Quality improvement strategies are needed to improve rates of LCS in PLWH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCancer Control
Volume29
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2022

Keywords

  • Human Immunodeficiency Virus
  • U.S. Preventive Services Task Force
  • cancer screening
  • lung cancer
  • people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLWH)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology

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